Melikian Faculty Affiliates

Lee B. Croft
INTERNATIONAL LETTERS AND CULTURES
Emeritus Professor
Ph.D., Cornell University
Research Interests:
poetics, linguistics
Dan Fellner
INTERDISCIPLINARY HUMANITIES AND COMMUNICATION
Faculty Associate
M.A., Ohio State University
Research Interests:
Public Relations, Print and Broadcast Journalism

Current professional activity: Dan Fellner, faculty associate in the Partnership for Community Development at ASU, recently completed a Fulbright Scholar grant teaching journalism at the American University in Bulgaria.  This fall, he will be teaching a class on Eastern Europe called “From Kiev to Kosovo” for ASU’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, and an Osher course on a dozen unique Jewish communities around the world, which will include a look at Jewish life in Ukraine and Serbia.  Dan also is a prolific travel writer for a variety of publications and recently wrote a story for The Arizona Republic about cruising Russia’s Volga River from Moscow to St. Petersburg.    

David Fossum
MUSIC
Assistant Professor
PhD, Brown University
Research Interests:
Musics of the Middle East and Central Asia and issues related to intellectual property law, cultural policy, religion and language
Frederick Giffin
HISTORY
Emeritus Professor
Ph.D., Emory University
Research Interests:
Soviet Union, U.S.-Russian Relations
Brian Goodman
ENGLISH
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., Harvard University
Research Interests:
Circulation of literature and culture between the United States and the Eastern bloc, particularly Czechoslovakia, during the Cold War.

Current research: Brian Goodman's research explores how Cold War-era discourses about literature, free expression, and human rights were shaped through transnational cultural exchange across the Iron Curtain. His current book project (under contract at Harvard University Press) maps the circulation of literature and culture between the United States and the Eastern bloc, particularly Czechoslovakia, from the late forties to the end of the Cold War. A chapter from this project, entitled "Philip Roth's Other Europe," has been published in American Literary History, and his recent writing on free expression issues has appeared in Public Books and the Los Angeles Review of Books. Goodman is also developing a new project that explores dissident literatures in comparative perspective. 

Brian Gratton
HISTORY
Emeritus Professor
Ph.D., Boston University
Research Interests:
U.S. Social and Immigration History; the Elderly; Mexican Americans and Hispanics; Bosnia and Hercegovina (BiH) Attitudinal Survey
Monica Green
HISTORY
Professor
Ph.D, Princeton University
Research Interests:
Global history of health, history of women's healthcare, medieval European history, digital humanities (manuscript culture)

Current research:  Monica H. Green, Professor of History, is currently working on a book, The Black Death: A Global History. Plague is a Eurasian disease par excellence. Its causative organism, the bacterium Yersinia pestis, originated on the northern Eurasia steppe sometime in the past 28,000 years, and although it is primarily a disease of wild animals, it has been the documented cause of major human mortality for the past 5000 years. The Black Death pandemic (usually dated 1346-1353, but actually "seeding" strains that survive to the present day) was without doubt the largest pandemic in human history, and our knowledge of it is being repeatedly overturned because of new developments in genetics. Using the new evolutionary narrative of Y. pestis's history provided by genetics, Green is recasting traditional narratives of the Black Death—which previously have seen it primarily as a Mediterranean and western European phenomenon—and broadening the narrative to include central and eastern Eurasia, as well as sub-Saharan Africa. This project seeks to show how and why the Middle Ages shaped the world we still inhabit today, including our own state of Arizona, where plague continues to thrive. With support from the Melikian Center, she presented a paper, "The Migrations of Plague in Mongol Eurasia: Reading Genetics as History,” at the conference, Migrations in Mongol Eurasia: People, Ideas, Artifacts, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 18-20 December 2017.

 

 

Aleksandra Gruzinska
INTERNATIONAL LETTERS AND CULTURES
Emeritus Professor
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University
Research Interests:
Polish, French
Margaret Hanson
POLITICS AND GLOBAL STUDIES
Assistant Professor
PhD, The Ohio State University
Research Interests:
Authoritarian governance, law and courts, formal and informal institutions, property rights, comparative political economy and development
Ana Hedberg Olenina
INTERNATIONAL LETTERS AND CULTURES
Assistant Professor
PhD, Harvard University
Research Interests:
Twentieth-century Russian literature and film, with a focus on the Soviet avant-garde

Representation of dance in Dziga Vertov_s Man with a Movie Camera 1929Current research: Ana Hedberg Olenina, Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature and Media Studies, is finalizing her book Psychomotor Aesthetics: Movement and Affect in Russian and American Modernity. In the late 19th century, neurophysiology introduced techniques for detecting somatic signs of psychological experiences. Scientific modes of recording, representing, and interpreting body movement as “expressive” soon found use in multiple cultural domains. Based on archival materials, this study charts the avenues by which physiological psychology reached the arts and evaluates institutional practices and political trends that promoted interdisciplinary engagements in the first quarter of the 20th century. In mapping the emergence of a paradigm I call “psychomotor aesthetics,” this study reveals how psychophysiology influenced film acting techniques, spurred the Russian and American film industries’ inquiries into spectators’ physical reactions, and prompted literary scholars to investigate poets’ and performers’ articulation. Among the authors discussed in this study are avant-garde filmmakers Sergei Eisenstein, Dziga Vertov, and Lev Kuleshov, the inventor of the polygraph lie detector William Moulton Marston, formalist scholars Viktor Shklovskii, Boris Eikhenbaum, and Sergei Bernshtein, performance theorists Genevieve Stebbins and Sergei Volkonskii, psychologists Vladimir Bekhterev, Lev Vygotsky, and Hugo Munsterberg. Both a history and a critical project, the book attends to the ways in which artists and theorists dealt with the universalist fallacies inherited from biologically-oriented psychology – at times, endorsing the positivist, deterministic outlook, and at times, resisting, reinterpreting, and defamiliarizing these scientific notions. In exposing the vastness of cross-disciplinary exchange at the juncture of neurophysiology and the arts at the turn of the 20th century, Psychomotor Aesthetics calls attention to the tremendous cultural resonance of theories foregrounding the somatic substrate of emotional and cognitive experience – theories, which anticipate the promises and limitations of today’s neuroaesthetics and neuromarketing.

Professor Olenina's film course - Fall 2018.

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