Melikian Faculty Affiliates

J. Eugene Clay
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of Chicago
Research Interests:
Eastern Orthodoxy, Russian Religious Dissent

Current research: J. Eugene Clay is currently completing a book manuscript provisionally entitled “The Woman Clothed with The Sun.”  This monograph explores the experience of Russian Spiritual Christians, whose spiritual vision of pacifism and human equality challenged the social hierarchies of both the Russian empire, where they originated, and the United States, where some of them eventually immigrated beginning in 1904. In both countries, the Spiritual Christians, who believed in the direct inspiration of the Holy Spirit, defied the inequalities of both American democracy and the Russian imperium. In Russia, the Spiritual Christians were persecuted and exiled for their religious beliefs; in the United States, they suffered for their commitment to pacifism and their unwillingness to register for the draft. By examining how Russian and American social categories of religion and race operated as tools of social control, this study sets in bold relief the ways that Russians and Americans understood their societies. It also tells an important and heroic story of ordinary people who, at great cost, remained true to their ideas of equality and peace.  The Melikian Center has supported research trips to major archival repositories and manuscript collections in the Russian Federation in 2016, 2017, and 2018.

Lee B. Croft
INTERNATIONAL LETTERS AND CULTURES
Emeritus Professor
Ph.D., Cornell University
Research Interests:
poetics, linguistics
Dan Fellner
INTERDISCIPLINARY HUMANITIES AND COMMUNICATION
Faculty Associate
M.A., Ohio State University
Research Interests:
Public Relations, Print and Broadcast Journalism

Current professional activity: Dan Fellner, faculty associate in the Partnership for Community Development at ASU, recently completed a Fulbright Scholar grant teaching journalism at the American University in Bulgaria.  This fall, he will be teaching a class on Eastern Europe called “From Kiev to Kosovo” for ASU’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, and an Osher course on a dozen unique Jewish communities around the world, which will include a look at Jewish life in Ukraine and Serbia.  Dan also is a prolific travel writer for a variety of publications and recently wrote a story for The Arizona Republic about cruising Russia’s Volga River from Moscow to St. Petersburg.    

David Fossum
MUSIC
Assistant Professor
PhD, Brown University
Research Interests:
Musics of the Middle East and Central Asia and issues related to intellectual property law, cultural policy, religion and language

Current research: As of January 2019, Dave Fossum is an Assistant Professor in the School of Music. Combining extensive ethnographic fieldwork and archival research, he studies ideas about creativity and intellectual property, focusing particularly on music in Turkey and Central Asia. He has received fellowships and grants from Brown University, the University of Pittsburgh, the American Research Institute in Turkey, and the Reed Foundation. He has published articles on traditional music in Turkmenistan and is writing a book titled “A Cult of Anonymity in the Age of Copyright: Creativity and Policy in Turkey’s Music Industry.” The book examines how concepts of musical creativity inform and are shaped by Turkey's cultural policy, particularly in state broadcasting and in the realm of intellectual property law and administration.

Frederick Giffin
HISTORY
Emeritus Professor
Ph.D., Emory University
Research Interests:
Soviet Union, U.S.-Russian Relations
Brian Goodman
ENGLISH
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., Harvard University
Research Interests:
Circulation of literature and culture between the United States and the Eastern bloc, particularly Czechoslovakia, during the Cold War.

Current research: Brian Goodman's research explores how Cold War-era discourses about literature, free expression, and human rights were shaped through transnational cultural exchange across the Iron Curtain. His current book project (under contract at Harvard University Press) maps the circulation of literature and culture between the United States and the Eastern bloc, particularly Czechoslovakia, from the late forties to the end of the Cold War. A chapter from this project, entitled "Philip Roth's Other Europe," has been published in American Literary History, and his recent writing on free expression issues has appeared in Public Books and the Los Angeles Review of Books. Goodman is also developing a new project that explores dissident literatures in comparative perspective. 

Brian Gratton
HISTORY
Emeritus Professor
Ph.D., Boston University
Research Interests:
U.S. Social and Immigration History; the Elderly; Mexican Americans and Hispanics; Bosnia and Hercegovina (BiH) Attitudinal Survey
Monica Green
HISTORY
Professor
Ph.D, Princeton University
Research Interests:
Global history of health, history of women's healthcare, medieval European history, digital humanities (manuscript culture)

Current research:  Monica H. Green, Professor of History, is currently working on a book, The Black Death: A Global History. Plague is a Eurasian disease par excellence. Its causative organism, the bacterium Yersinia pestis, originated on the northern Eurasia steppe sometime in the past 28,000 years, and although it is primarily a disease of wild animals, it has been the documented cause of major human mortality for the past 5000 years. The Black Death pandemic (usually dated 1346-1353, but actually "seeding" strains that survive to the present day) was without doubt the largest pandemic in human history, and our knowledge of it is being repeatedly overturned because of new developments in genetics. Using the new evolutionary narrative of Y. pestis's history provided by genetics, Green is recasting traditional narratives of the Black Death—which previously have seen it primarily as a Mediterranean and western European phenomenon—and broadening the narrative to include central and eastern Eurasia, as well as sub-Saharan Africa. This project seeks to show how and why the Middle Ages shaped the world we still inhabit today, including our own state of Arizona, where plague continues to thrive. With support from the Melikian Center, she presented a paper, "The Migrations of Plague in Mongol Eurasia: Reading Genetics as History,” at the conference, Migrations in Mongol Eurasia: People, Ideas, Artifacts, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 18-20 December 2017.

 

 

Gary Grossman
FUTURE OF INNOVATION IN SOCIETY
Associate Professor
PhD, Purdue University
Research Interests:
Issues of education and training in Hungary, Moldova, and Turkey
Aleksandra Gruzinska
INTERNATIONAL LETTERS AND CULTURES
Emeritus Professor
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University
Research Interests:
Polish, French

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