Migrations of Plague in Mongol Eurasia

November 29, 2017
Copyright: © 2017 Eroshenko et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and sourc
12:15 PM
ASU Tempe campus - Coor Hall, Rm 4403 [4th floor]
Event Description: 

Works-in-Progress Lunch Seminar Series

"The Migrations of Plague in Mongol Eurasia: Reading Genetics as History" by Prof. Monica Green

Monica Green earned a Ph.D. in History from Princeton University. She currently serves as a professor in the School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies at ASU. Green specializes in the Global History of Health and Medieval European History, particularly the history of medicine and the history of gender. Among her books are included: the edited volume, Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death (Arc Medieval Press, 2014); Making Women’s Medicine Masculine: the rise of Male Authority in Pre-Modern Gynaecology (Oxford U Press, 2008); and The Trotula: A Medieval Compendium of Women’s Medicine (U of Pennsylvania Press, 2001). She is a Fellow of the Medieval Academy of America and was awarded the Joseph H. Hazen Education Prize in 2014.

 

Lunch will be served. 

Please do RSVP by Wednesday, NOV 22, at noon [before Thanksgiving].

Copyright: © 2017 Eroshenko et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and sourc

Fig 1. Natural plague foci of Kyrgyzstan and distribution of Yersinia pestis strains, from: Eroshenko GA, Nosov NY, Krasnov YM, Oglodin YG, Kukleva LM, Guseva NP, et al. (2017). Yersinia pestis strains of ancient phylogenetic branch 0.ANT are widely spread in the high-mountain plague foci of Kyrgyzstan. PLoS ONE 12 (10): e0187230. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0187230 
Copyright: © 2017 Eroshenko et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.